Home » A Simple Guide to Folic Acid, Functions, Deficiency and Treatment by Kenneth Kee
A Simple Guide to Folic Acid, Functions, Deficiency and Treatment Kenneth Kee

A Simple Guide to Folic Acid, Functions, Deficiency and Treatment

Kenneth Kee

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Kindle Edition
73 pages
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 About the Book 

IntroductionOde To Folic Acid deficiencyFolic acid is present in all living human tissuesIt reacts with iron and vitamin B12 to form Red blood cellsFolic acid is crucial for proper brain functionFolic acid is also needed for growth andMoreIntroductionOde To Folic Acid deficiencyFolic acid is present in all living human tissuesIt reacts with iron and vitamin B12 to form Red blood cellsFolic acid is crucial for proper brain functionFolic acid is also needed for growth and reproductionIt aids in the production of DNA and RNA the bodys genesIt also controls blood levels of the amino acid homocysteine.Pregnant women need folic acid to reduce neural tube birth defectsBy taking folic acid early these neural tube defects are preventedFolic acid Deficiency is due to inadequate dietary intake or impaired absorptionFolic acid deficiency can cause poor growth and tongue inflammationThere may be anemia and mental irritabilityThere is often poor appetite and gingivitisTreatment is by taking fortified foods and supplementsIdeally you should take folic acid under a doctor’s supervisionCertain medicines may interact with the folateSuch as antibiotics, antacids and methotrexate-An original poem by Kenneth KeeInteresting Tips about the Folic Acid deficiencyA Healthy Lifestyle1. Take a well Balanced Diet2. Folic Acid (Vitamin B9) is found in multivitamins including childrens chewable and liquid drops and B complex vitamins or is sold separately.Recommended Dosages of Folic AcidMost people (except pregnant women) should be able to get enough folic acid from their diet.Daily recommendations for dietary folic acid are listed below:PediatricInfants 0 - 6 months: 65 mcg (adequate intake)Infants 7 - 12 months: 80 mcg (adequate intake)Children 1 - 3 years: 150 mcg (RDA)Children 4 - 8 years: 200 mcg (RDA)Children 9 - 13 years: 300 mcg (RDA)Teens 14 - 18 years: 400 mcg (RDA)Adult19 years and older: 400 mcg (RDA)Pregnant women: 600 mcg (RDA)Breastfeeding women: 500 mcg (RDA)3. Keep bones and body strongBone marrow produces our bloodEat foods rich in calcium like yogurt, cheese, milk, and dark green vegetables.Eat foods rich in Vitamin D, like eggs, fatty fish, cereal, and fortified milk.Eat food rich in Vitamins B and C such as green vegetables and fruitsZinc and other minerals are important to the body4. Get enough rest and SleepAvoid stress and tension5. Exercise and stay active.It is best to do weight-bearing exercise such as walking, jogging, stair climbing, dancing, or lifting weights for 2½ hours a week.One way to do this is to be active 30 minutes a day at least 5 days a week.Begin slowly especially if a person has not been active.6. Do not drink more than 2 alcohol drinks a day for a man or 1 alcohol drink a day for a woman.Alcohol use also increases the chance of falling and breaking a bone.Alcohol can affect the neurons and brain cells.7. Stop or do not begin smoking.It also interferes with blood supply and healing.Chapter 1Folic acid (Vitamin B9)Vitamin B9 (folic acid) is present in all living human tissues as important enzymes in amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism and red blood cells production.