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Shakuntala Kālidāsa

Shakuntala

Kālidāsa

Published
ISBN : 9781230291338
Paperback
34 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1894 edition. Excerpt: ...Shakuntala recollectingMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1894 edition. Excerpt: ...Shakuntala recollecting herself. Father! I must bid farewell to my tendril sister the Light of the Grove. Kanva. I know thy sisterly affection for the jasmine. Here it is, on the right. Shakuntala approaching the jasmine. Thou Light of the Grove, though thou be wedded to the mango tree, yet embrace me with thy twining arms which now thou extendest toward me. From this day I must dwell afar from thee. Kanva. As erst my soul for thee designed, By pleasing virtues hast thou won A worthy spouse. This jasmine too Has joined the mango tree. Henceforth No anxious care for thee, nor her! Now proceed on thy journey. Shakuntala to her two friends. To you, my dear friends, I intrust its care. The Two Friends. And into what friendly hands do you now commit us? Wiping away their gathering tears. Kanva. Ah, Anasuya, no more crying! You should instead cheer Shakuntala. Allproceed, Shakuntala. Dear father, yonder near the cottage grazes my doe, heavy with the young she carries. When she is a mother you will let me know the pleasing news, will you not? Kanva. I will not forget it. Shakuntala feeling herself checked. But what is that fastened to my dress? Turns around. Kanva. Dear daughter: The fawn, thy foster child, it is, Whom thine own hand has gently fed With grains of rice- the fawn whose mouth, When stung by Kusha, thou didst heal With soothing oil of Ingudi. He cannot now forsake thy path. Shakuntala. Why, dear little fawn, dost thou follow me, who am forsaking my friends? I did nurse thee when soon after thy birth thy mother died- now, when I am gone, my father will care for thee. Therefore follow me no more. Moves on, weeping. Kanva. Be firm, and wipe away the tears That cling unto thy fringed eye! They make thy steps uncertain here Upon...